New & Special Topic Courses

ANTH 339: Comparative Osteology (4) Comprehensive study of human skeletal anatomy, focusing on the adult human skeleton, with context provided by exploration of developmental juvenile osteology, the musculoskeletal system, functional anatomy, and comparison to nonhuman animal bones common in forensic and archaeological contexts.

ANTH 359: Digitization in Archaeology (4) Introduction to the methods of post-processing of archaeological data. Students will work with primary data and will help to bring the materials into an accessible framework. The students will be exposed to the essentials for digital site documentation and digital asset management, GIS, LiDAR, digital illustration, and 3D photogrammetry.

ART 396B: Guest Artist Workshop (1) Alicia McCarthy will be here in October to meet with students and talk with them about their work as well as giving a slide lecture on her work and process.

ART 301: Gender and Sexuality in Art (3) Explores modern art and visual culture through the lens of gender and sexuality. Major themes include queer art, women as artists and subjects, and the body in representation.

ART 301: The Museum (3) From Renaissance cabinets of curiosities to contemporary institutions such as the MOCA LA, this course will examine the development and evolution of the Museum as a cultural and educational institution.

ART 302: Chinese Painting History (3) From magical mountains of immortality to heavenly horses, the metaphysical void, deities, emperors and women, an aesthetic and theoretical exploration of the poetic, political, narrative and philosophical painting traditions in China.

ART 372: Climate Conscious Design (3) Explores the relationships between the environmental design disciplines and sustainability, as well as social and environmental activism through design. Use digital and hands on processes to research, communicate and visualize the stakes and solutions of climate change.

AHSS 102: Humboldt Peoples & Places (3) Surveys the history of the people and places of Humboldt County. Analysis of political, economic, social, intellectual events, and the interactions among the diverse populations that reside here. [NEW LD GE E.]

AHSS 109 Bilingual Experience in California (3) Best practices from a bilingual perspective to be successful on campus and in life. Improve your Spanish, get involved, and explore university agencies and resources. Taught in English and Spanish. [Rec: Intermediate Spanish language abilities or Heritage Speaker of Spanish. NEW LD GE E.]

BIOL 685: Scale and Hierarchy in Ecology (1) Seminar will focus on working across multiple spatial and temporal scales/levels of organization to provide unique insights into ecological dynamics, ultimately seeking generalizations across a range of ecological disciplines.

BIOL 685: Pollination Biology (1) Discussion of recent research on the natural history, ecology, and conservation of interactions between plants and pollinators.

COMM 480: Rhetorical Political Economy (3) The important relationship between persuasion and political economy will be covered and students will gain knowledge in rhetorical theory, political economy, and governing institutions.

ENGL 240: Caribbean Literature (4) Focuses on the literature, history, and culture of the English-speaking Caribbean, emphasizing the role of diaspora and oral tradition in the region’s literary history.

ENGL 336: American Ethnic Literature:  Performing Race and Gender (4) Analyze fiction, drama, film and autobiography exploring social/legal constructions of race, gender, sexuality. What are rewards / punishments for fitting or challenging these boxes?  Readings include Hwang, Moraga, Cliff, Uyehara, Sui Sin Far, Larsen, West, and the film Moonlight.

ENGL 350: British Literature (4) Reading The Country and the City: Imperialist encounters; nature and travel writing; class, race, gender in the country and city; pastoral and lyric forms; Victorian and later fiction.

ENGL 420: Politics and Aesthetics (4) Literary, artistic and political responses to 18th century birth of aesthetics.  English and German Romantics; 19th century aesthetic ideas; imperialist and gender ideologies; modernists; postmodernists; non-Western aesthetics.

ENGL 620: Politics and Aesthetics (4) Literary, artistic and political responses to 18th century birth of aesthetics.  English and German Romantics; 19th century aesthetic ideas; imperialist and gender ideologies; modernists; postmodernists; non-Western aesthetics.

ENGR 481: Water and Environmental Organic Chemistry for Engineers (3) Prediction of the fate and transport of anthropogenic organic chemicals in aquatic environments, focusing on 1) physical transformations and 2) chemical transformations.  [Prereq: ENGR 416 (C).]

ES 480: Campus Dialogue on Race (1) Dynamic speakers, workshops, exhibits and screenings that relate to racial justice, civil rights, democracy, intersectional analysis, and strategies for transformation. [CR/NC.]

ES 480: Growing Up Chicana/Latino (3) Using fiction, nonfiction, poetry and film, this course will explore issues relevant to Chicana/Latino youth in the U.S., including recent unaccompanied Central American migrants, with a focus on activism, identity, gender, citizenship, and culture.

ES 336: American Ethnic Literature:  Performing Race and Gender (4) Analyze fiction, drama, film and autobiography exploring social/legal constructions of race, gender, sexuality. What are rewards / punishments for fitting or challenging these boxes?  Readings include Hwang, Moraga, Cliff, Uyehara, Sui Sin Far, Larsen, West, and the film Moonlight.

FILM 477: Audio Production for Digital Storytelling (4) Produce audio and video projects with an emphasis on using sound to support both fiction and non-fiction stories. Interview techniques, field recording, use of descriptive sound effects, sound design, editing and sound theory will be primary subjects. The physics of sound, equipment properties, and viewer/listener experience will be explored.

FREN 100: Enlightenment and Post-Colonialism (3) Use critical thinking to explore culture and power in arguments by Enlightenment and Post-Colonial thinkers. Compare methods of reasoning in France and former colonies. Taught in English. [NEW LD GE A3: Critical Thinking.]

HIST 391: American Military Traditions (4) History of the United States military from colonial times through the twenty-first century. American civil-military relations including the debate over the nation relying on a standing army or militia for national defense and the rise of professionalism in the military, technological and tactical developments, and the military’s role in a democratic society.

JMC 480: Investigative Journalism (3) Learn how to investigate a societal problem using journalistic techniques including public records requests, interviews and collecting and analyzing data with the goal of publishing the results of their project in a story in a local news publication.

MUS 180: Beginning Music Reading (1) For music majors and others who enter HSU with minimal music-reading skills. [Coreq:  MUS 108K.]

PHIL 480: Convention vs. Mysticism in Language (1) Since John Locke’s 1690 Essay on Human Understanding, his view that language is based on conventional connections has become nearly the consensus in philosophy of language. Those who do not accept it, though, include Heraclitus with his view of “Logos” and Wittgenstein’s Ordinary Language Philosophy, and a few others. We will investigate.

PHIL 485: Stoicism (3) Examination and application of Stoic philosophy, psychology and techniques for living a free, serene and flourishing life. Focus on Roman Stoicism (Epictetus, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius) and Stoicism’s contemporary revival.

PSYC 480: Culture & Diversity in Psychology (3) Focuses on the intersectionality of culture, race/ethnicity, diversity, and psychology. Using theory and empirical research, we will examine how these factors play a role in individuals’ attitudes, values, behaviors, and psychological process for various diverse groups. Students will learn to employ the constructs of multiculturalism and diversity in psychological. As well, as learn the importance of conducting research that is culturally sensitive.

PSYC 480: Social Neuroscience (3) Provides a textbook and article based overview of the neurobiological mechanisms and evolutionary origins of social behavior and technical research methods used in the field of social neuroscience. Each module is designed to evaluate key research topics in social neuroscience. We will discuss influential behavioral, neuroimaging, neurophysiological, and neuroendocrinological studies in both humans and nonhuman animals. [Prereq: PSYC 104; PSYC 240 or 242; PSYC 321 (or BIOL 104 or 105) with a C- or better.]

PSYC 680: Social Neuroscience (3) Provides a textbook and article based overview of the neurobiological mechanisms and evolutionary origins of social behavior and technical research methods used in the field of social neuroscience. Each module is designed to evaluate key research topics in social neuroscience. We will discuss influential behavioral, neuroimaging, neurophysiological, and neuroendocrinological studies in both humans and nonhuman animals. Students will also present course material in a variety of academic formats. [Prereq: PSYC 641(C)]

SOC 280: Student Rights/Civil Liberties (1) Educates students on legal rights/provides basic working knowledge of: general civil liberties law, student rights on campus, tenant rights, cannabis law, debt collection/bankruptcy, immigration, employment, family, traffic court, DUI, small claims, and police misconduct.

SOC 480: Migration & the Global Economy (4) Explores human movement within the context of the global economy.  We will explore the political and economic underpinnings of mass migration and raise questions about international human rights, the privileging of profit, and the criminalization of mobility. [CJS Majors Knowledge Area: Inequalities, Identities and Crime. SOC Knowledge Area: Inequalities and Change]

SOC 480: Drugs and Society (4) Explores the social, cultural, political and economic processes shaping contemporary drug policies. History and theory of social causes and consequences of use and abuse of consciousness altering substances. [CJS Majors Knowledge Area: Justice and Policy. SOC Knowledge Area: Communities & Identity]

SPAN 370: Spanish Retreat Seminar (1) Restricted seminar for Spanish Heritage speakers; preference given to SPAN 108S students.  Meets one weekend off-campus.  Cultural heritage trip to San Francisco using only Spanish for communication.  Contact instructor for permission number. [CR/NC.]

SPAN 480: Capstone Service Learning Experience (1) Course associated with SPAN 492. Students work with various local organizations and the Hispanic community. Valuable opportunities to apply and reflect on learning as well as work with the technical and social complexities of providing services to the community.

WS 336: American Ethnic Literature:  Performing Race and Gender (4) Analyze fiction, drama, film and autobiography exploring social/legal constructions of race, gender, sexuality. What are rewards / punishments for fitting or challenging these boxes?  Readings include Hwang, Moraga, Cliff, Uyehara, Sui Sin Far, Larsen, West, and the film Moonlight.

 

Disclosure of Student Information

We take your privacy seriously. Read more about the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

FERPA